Tylar Ann Colleluori

Tylar Ann Colleluori

Tylar Colleluori is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Italian at Columbia University. Besides being a Teaching Fellow in the department, she is also a Senior Teaching Observation Fellow with the Center for Teaching and Learning, as well as the Managing Editor of Scholar & Feminist Online, the web journal of the Barnard Center for Research on Women.

Before attending Columbia, she graduated summa cum laude from the University of Pittsburgh in 2014 with a dual B.A. in Italian and Anthropology, a minor in Linguistics, and a Certificate in Western European Studies with a focus on European Humanities. As an undergraduate, Tylar was awarded the Gilman International Scholarship to spend a semester abroad in Florence. She was a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, as well as the Italian Honor Society Gamma Kappa Alpha.  

In 2016, Tylar completed her M.A. in Italian Literature, also from the University of Pittsburgh. During her time as a Master’s student, Tylar gained experience teaching Elementary Italian 1 and 2, and she was also the Program Assistant for the University of Pittsburgh’s Pitt-in-Rome Program. Her experience outside the university included a position as the Museum Division Intern in the Italian-American Archives at the Senator John Heinz History Center, where she gained experience cataloguing in the archives, transcribing oral histories, and planning various community events at the center.

Throughout her time at Columbia, she has been working with Italian Renaissance texts, developing an interest in the chivalric epic genre and paying specific attention to women writers of these works. She has also worked on digital humanities projects through which she hopes to make complicated connections between characters in literary works more intelligible, by mapping genealogical relations found in works such as Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando innamorato and Baldassare Castiglione's Il cortegiano. Her continuing research interests include Renaissance chivalric epic, mythical literary genealogies, and questions surrounding female authorship and the female narrative voice.