Why study Italian?

In his early twenties, the English poet Robert Browning fell in love with Italy.  "Italy," he declared, "was my university."  Well, Italy still is one of the most attractive and fascinating "universities" in the world—its language one of the most beautiful, its culture one of the richest, its cities and monuments among civilization's marvels.  If you are interested in finding out what “Italy”—that is, what Italian culture and history and perhaps even a sojourn in the country itself—can offer you in your life while you are in college, you should consider a major or concentration in Italian.  There is no better place to study Italy's language and literature, from Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli and Ariosto to Pirandello, Ungaretti, Montale, Calvino and Dario Fo, than the Italian Department at Columbia University.  Columbia’s Italian Department has an interesting history, its origins going back to the early 1800s when Lorenzo Da Ponte, Mozart’s librettist for “Don Giovanni,” “Le nozze di Figaro,” and “Cosí fan tutte,” first introduced Italian Studies into the curriculum of Columbia College.  Over the years since then, the Department has had a rich history of cultural exchange and interaction with Italian intellectuals and artists, and it continues to offer its students the benefits of these ongoing connections.
 
 
 Why study Italian?, continued...



 

Summary: 
Why study Italian?